From Acts to the Epistles
by Arlen L. Chitwood

        Foreword       Chapter 1      Chapter 2

        Chapter 3       Chapter 4      Chapter 5

        Chapter 6       Chapter 7      Chapter 8

        Chapter 9      Chapter 10    Chapter 11

        Chapter 12    Chapter 13


         Documents in Microsoft Word Format:

        Foreword      Chapter 1      Chapter 2

        Chapter 3      Chapter 4      Chapter 5

        Chapter 6      Chapter 7      Chapter 8

        Chapter 9     Chapter 10    Chapter 11

        Chapter 12   Chapter 13


           Questions for Study and Review

Scripture deals centrally with man in relation to a province within the kingdom of God ó this earth.  This province forms a kingdom within the overall kingdom of God, and man was created to rule this kingdom.

The kingdom that man was created to rule has two spheres ó an earthly sphere, and a heavenly sphere.  And the kingdom is ruled from the heavens over the domain ó from the heavens over the earth.

God rules the whole of His universal kingdom in this manner (from a place in the heavens over His universal kingdom), and this is the manner in which He has established the governmental rule of individual provinces in His kingdom as well.

Both spheres of the kingdom are clearly seen in the Old Testament (e.g., Daniel 6:1ff; 10:13ff); but, in relation to man, the Old Testament deals more specifically with the earthly sphere, and the New Testament deals more specifically with the heavenly sphere.

Accordingly, this book, From Acts to the Epistles, has to do with man in relation to the heavenly sphere of the kingdom, not the earthly sphere.  And this would be easy to understand by noting the clearly revealed content of the New Testament as a whole.  

The central theme of the four Gospels (introduced in the Old Testament) has to do with the offer of the kingdom of the heavens to Israel, ending with Israelís rejection of the King and the Kingdom, resulting in the King being crucified.

The central theme of the book of Acts (introduced in the Gospels) has to do with a re-offer of the kingdom of the heavens to Israel, ending with Israelís continued rejection, resulting in the nation being set aside.

The central theme of the epistles (introduced in Acts) has to do with the offer of the kingdom of the heavens to Christians, resulting in ready acceptance at first, but later in an ever-increasing apostasy.

And the book of Revelation forms a climax to the entire matter, outlining events that will occur at the conclusion of this present dispensation.  The book closes with the return of Christ in all His glory, the overthrow of Gentile world power, the ushering in of the Messianic Kingdom (with both its heavenly and earthly spheres), and the beginning of the eternal ages that follow.

 

In the grace of our Savior,,
 
Charles